How to spend a winter weekend in Malta

With its gorgeous weather and picturesque spots such as Comino and the Blue Lagoon, the Mediterranean island of Malta, sitting unassumingly between Southern Italy and the tip of Libya, attracts thousands of sun-seeking tourists in the summer months. However, winter is also a great time to visit if you want to skip the beaches and explore the island while avoiding the crowds.

Visit the Silent City of Mdina

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Pretty alleys make for cute photo stops

Mdina is a photographer’s dream. The entrance, an impressive stone archway, was used as a filming location for Game of Thrones and leads through to a fortified medieval city filled with winding passageways with cute doorways and balconies around every corner. While these narrow alleys are crammed full of tourists in the summer months, in January the ‘Silent City’ is just that, making for people-free photos!

Fontanella is the perfect spot to take a break for a coffee and enormous slice of cake. In summer, the terrace has beautiful views across the island to the ocean, but in winter you can head inside and find a cosy spot next to the log burner. The cake menu is huge, but be sure to also grab a couple of pastizzi, a savoury Maltese pastry filled with either crushed peas or ricotta. Delicious and cheap at only 65 cents!

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Turquoise doors set against sun-bleached walls
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Lose yourself in the medieval passageways
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Pretty doors for days

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Recognise this arch? Mdina was used as a filming location for King’s Landing in GoT
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Love the soothing, neutral tones
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Mdina’s labyrinthine passages
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Cake and Pastizzi at Fontanella
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Can I move in?!
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Pretty shutters and balconies overhead
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Hidden corners

 Meander around the pretty little capital of Valletta

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The beautiful Upper Barrakka Gardens in Valletta

No visit to Malta would be complete without a trip to its tiny capital city. Valletta is set on a hill and its steep, sloping roads lead down to the water, lined with enticing shops and restaurants. There is a church or a palace seemingly around every corner and the tall walls draw your eyes up to the intricate carvings on the corners of buildings or the little balconies and colourful shutters overhead. At the pretty Upper Barrakka Gardens, take in the panoramic view over the harbour and the Three Cities, before heading down a bustling side street for some lunch. Streat Cafe is a central spot that serves up tasty burgers and enormous salads!

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View over the Three Cities
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Colourful little streets in Valletta

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 Visit picturesque Popeye village

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This slightly surreal attraction was originally a film set for the Popeye musical back in 1980 starring the wonderful, late Robin Williams. Perched on a cliff top above the turquoise waters of a secret cove, the set is now open to tourists and is perfect for a family day out. Even without entering the village, the views across the bay are worth the drive over!

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Even in January it’s tempting to jump in that turquoise water!
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Can you spot Olive Oyl?
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This place has an  almost other-worldly feel!

So if you’re planning a quick weekend away for culture, views and some winter sun, Malta should be top of your list!

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An alternative side to Paris; discovering bohemian Belleville 

We all have an image of Paris;  long, leafy boulevards lined with expensive stores and restaurants and haughty, impossibly chic women walking designer dogs while chain smoking thin cigarettes as the Eiffel tower twinkles in the distance. And that’s exactly what you see wandering down the Champs-Elysées or around picture-perfect neighbourhoods like Montmartre and Saint Germain des Pres.

But, as locals will tell you, this is not the real Paris. Many Parisians live outside of the centre, in the eastern suburbs. Belleville is an arty, multicultural neighbourhood in the 19th arrondissement, which sounds horribly far away but is actually only a 10 minute metro ride from the Arc de Triomphe. Few tourists wander out this way so there are limited hotel options, but as always, Air B&B is your friend. We found an entire apartment for around 120 euros a night, which was slightly on the pricey side but was perfectly located and absolutely gorgeous, with it’s airy, loft-like feel and cosy mezzanine bedroom. Mathieu’s place is in the heart of bustling Belleville, next to the Metro station and located conveniently next door to a shiny Sephora. (Au revoir hard-earned euros…)

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Mind your head on the ceiling upstairs! This quirky little loft was perfect for our stay.

Belleville is a hub of activity on Friday afternoon with the market in full swing and bars are already full of people fuelling themselves for the day with an espresso or two. There is a thriving Asian community here and we pause to grab a traditional Vietnamese sandwich, or banh mi; a baguette filled with pork, salad, coriander and fresh chilli. Delicious, filling and less than 3 euros!

Belleville is arguably most famous for being the birth place of Édith Piaf; the tragic, yet iconic ‘little sparrow.’ On the main street, at 72 Rue de Belleville, a simple gold plaque sits above a nondescript doorway which reads; ‘On the steps of this house in December 1915, was born into poverty Edith Piaf, whose voice would later move the world.’ Well, that’s my rough translation anyway! She was buried in Belleville in the famous Pere Lachaise cemetery along with many other iconic figures, including greats such as Jim Morrison and Oscar Wilde, whose grave is covered in lipstick kisses, not to mention French literary giants Moliere and Marcel Proust. You can take a guided tour of the cemetery, which is an interesting, if slightly morbid, way to spend an afternoon.

Edith-Piaf-birthplace

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‘La môme’

Homages to Piaf can be found dotted around the neighbourhood, a large, melancholy mural of her is painted on the wall of ‘Aux Folies’ where she used to sing in the 1920s, This infamous bar is always busy, crammed with coffee drinkers in the morning and, in the evening, the terrace is packed full of people chatting, smoking and enjoying a 4 euro beer or a couple of 6 euro cocktails. No outrageous Champs-Élysées prices here and the punters are mainly locals.

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‘I want to make people cry even when they don’t understand my words.’

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Immediately next to Aux Folies is Rue Denoyez, better known as Graffiti Alley, where the walls, street lamps, even the litter bins are entirely covered in bright street art. Tucked away down this colourful side street is Barbouquin, a little cafe filled with a jumble of books which you can leaf through as you while away an hour so with a coffee or a glass of wine.

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Le Barbouquin; cafe/bookshop/library/super chilled hangout spot

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We can’t leave Belleville without trying what is tipped as the trendiest new patisserie in Paris. Yann Couvreur is a celebrated pastry chef, and at his bright new bakery you can enjoy a 9 euro breakfast of coffee, fruit juice and something delicious like a Breton Kouign Amann or a Pistachio Chocolat Roule. This patisserie is famous for its classic ‘millefeuille’ which is whipped up fresh in front of you. Only 50 of these delicious French clsssics are made daily between 12 and 6, and its first come first served. At 10 euros its an expensive treat but one worth splashing out for, and this place gets top marks for decor and pretty packaging.

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Only a few thousand calories…tant pis!
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Get in quick if you want to get your hands on their signature millefeuille…
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A patisserie with attractive servers AND dangly foliage… win

So if you’ve already seen the picture-perfect side to Paris and are looking for a new neighbourhood to explore, follow in Piaf’s footsteps and head to Belleville to spend a day like a true Parisian.