The ultimate ‘Paris in a day’ itinerary

The route

Belleville – Montmartre – Moulin Rouge – Arc de Triomphe – Champs Elysées – Jardin des Tuileries – Le Louvre – Notre Dame – St Germain des Pres –  Eiffel Tower

With the Eurostar flinging itself into the French capital in less than 2 hours from London, it has never been easier to ‘pop into Paris.’ Short city breaks are a must when you work full time and it’s cheap and easy for us Brits to dash off for a spontaneous day in Rome or a boozy weekend in Amsterdam. Although you could visit these urban hotspots countless times, and still find something new to discover, it is possible to see the best bits in just a few hours. (And without using up any of your precious annual leave!) The City of Light is no exception, so if you are seriously short on time and just want to see the top spots in Paris, then read on for a guide on how to cram all the iconic sights into just one day!

Starting point: Belleville

The hardest part of amy city trip is deciding where to stay. Central Parisian hotels are extortionate so the cheapest option is to find an Air B&B slightly outside the centre and take the tube around the city. This can be daunting for first-timers, but ‘le metro’ is easy to navigate and you can buy a bundle of 10 one-way tickets for 15 euros from the machines inside the stations. We found a great Air B&B in Belleville, an arty eastern suburb, only a 10 minute metro ride from the centre of Paris. This was the perfect base, showing us a ‘real’ side to the city as well as the picture-perfect touristy spots. Not to mention it’s home to the best millefeuille in Paris. (Read about this underrated neighbourhood here.)

 

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Graffiti alleys in Belleville

Metro to Montmartre and the Sacré Coeur

From Belleville we take the metro to Anvers, where a short walk up a cobbled street leads to a grassy hill, at the top of which the impressive Sacré Coeur looks out over the city.

Take a moment to soak in the panoramic view of the capital and, if you’re a fan of French cinema, you can even reenact that scene from Amelie and follow your own trail of blue arrows. Most of the movie was filmed here in Montmartre and there are lots of spots to keep an eye out four, like the Deux Moulins cafe and the famous Maison Collignon Grocery store.

 

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The famous Maison Collignon in Amelie’s neighbourhood
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Take a stroll up to the Sacre Coeur

 

From the Sacré Coeur, follow the winding, cobblestone streets past the cheerful accordion players into the bustling heart of Montmartre, where the streets are lined with charming cafes, pricey boutiques and leafy squares. There are so many little side-roads to explore; great for avoiding the crowds although it’s easy to lose your bearings around here so be sure to have Google maps to hand. (Or one of those big,  fold-out maps if you’re feeling old school.)

 

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Pretty little boutiques dotted around Montmartre

 

Moulin Rouge to L’arc de triomphe

When you’ve finished exploring, head down to Blanche metro station where the historic Moulin Rouge makes for a great photo stop. From here, take the metro all the way to Charles de Gaulle Etoile, where you’ll emerge directly underneath the impressive Arc de Triomphe. Wait for an opportune gap in the heavy stream of traffic before jumping out into the road for a photo, and whatever you do, don’t try to cross the road to the arch! Take the underpass instead and you’ll avoid being écrasé.

 

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Opportune break in traffic at l’Arc de Triomphe

 

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Try your hand at can-can at the Moulin Rouge

 

Walk all the way from the Champs-Elysées to Notre Dame

From the Arc, you can walk all the way down the Champs-Elysées and do a spot of shopping in the designer boutiques. The only way to experience this famous stretch of road is on foot, so wander slowly down, stopping mid-way to take a break to people-watch with an overpriced beer at a café bar. If you fancy indulging, be sure to pop into Pierre Hermé where you can pick up some Occitaine skincare goodies and a box of pretty pastel macarons.

Continue walking until you reach the beautiful Jardin des Tuileries which will lead you to the unmistakable glass pyramids of The Louvre. You can head inside and wrestle your way through the tourists to catch a glimpse of the Mona Lisa, or skip the interior and spend a while admiring the impressive exterior architecture.

From the Louvre, it’s around a 20 minute walk along the river to Notre Dame, where you can pause for photos and then cocktails at one of the surrounding bars. Arrive at dusk to see the lights appear in the windows, slowly illuminating this this iconic medieval cathedral.

 

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Keeping an eye out for Quasimodo

 

Start the evening in beautiful, bohemian St Germain des Prés

If you’re not exhausted from all the walking, you can continue a little further along to the  fashionable neighbourhood of St Germain des Prés, which is filled with chic bars, gorgeous homeware stores and independent fashion boutiques. Don’t miss Les Deux Magots, old-time Hemingway haunt and possibly the most famous bar in the city. Treat yourself to a giant macaron from a nearby patisserie before stopping for a well earned drink on the terrace at the uber-instagrammable Maison Sauvage which is covered in cascading white flowers and foliage.

 

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Don’t leave Paris without trying at least one macaron!
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Check out Maison Sauvage’s Instagram page for swoon-worthy decor and mouthwatering foodie inspo!
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Write your next novel at famed literary spot, Les Deux Magots

 

Save the best til last…

Finally, to finish the day in style, head for dinner and drinks at Cafe de L’homme, which boasts arguably the best view in the entire city. What better way to end a day roaming Paris than drinking a glass of sparkling champagne in front of the equally sparkling Eiffel Tower? Santé!

 

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No better view to finish the day with

(P.S Getting engaged in Paris is not essential but certainly encouraged!)

5 things to do in Oia, the prettiest place you’ll ever visit

Steeped in sunshine and mythology, with its thousands of islands dotted around the Mediterranean, Greece is a firm bucket list destination. Each island has its own particular charm, but Santorini is undeniably the star of the show here; the tiny island on every Instagrammer’s travel wish list. A once circular island, now long and skinny after a volcanic eruption thousands of years ago, the sea is visible from almost anywhere on the island. Apart from the breathtaking view of the ocean, the island’s centre is not particularly Insta-worthy. The road winds around low, sloping fields of sun-scorched earth and scrubby shrubbery, past half constructed hotels and caves carved into the sides of the huge volcanic rock that lines the roadside. It is the east edge of the island that makes Santorini such a sought-after destination, where the sun-bleached buildings are stacked one above the other in staggered rows, clinging precariously to the cliffside. There are four main towns on Santorini, each one perched, postcard-pretty, overlooking the cobalt blue caldera. Fira is the bustling capital and the liveliest spot on the island for an evening out. The towns of Imerovigli and Firestofani are quieter but just as pretty, with luxury hotels nestled among seafood restaurants with breathtaking views. But the most popular and photogenic spot is Oia. Having seen so many heavily-filtered, over-edited Instagram posts, I was a little worried it wouldn’t live up to the hype. Luckily, this was one occasion where the hype was justified. Oia is literally like a picture in a glossy brochure. Impeccably clean, grey and white paved pathways snake down past luxury apartments, each one boasting its own little rectangle of turquoise water. The iconic blue domed churches are dotted about, interspersing the white buildings set against the deep cobalt blue of the ocean. Everything is white and bright, with dashes of pink bougainvillea that wraps itself prettily around everything. If you’ve got a day or 2 to spend in Oia, here are 5 things you must do!

1. Walk the 350 steps down (and back up!) to Ammoudi Bay

This teeny, tiny port is Santorini’s best kept secret and leads to the island’s best swimming spot. After walking through Oia’s main street you will find yourself near the castle ruins, at the top of a long flight of steps that will take you all the way down to a small cove with nothing but a few fishing boats and a handful of seafood restaurants. A rocky pathway leads around to a gorgeous swimming spot where the water is crystal clear. Spend a while swimming and leaping from the rocks if you’re brave enough, before heading over to Sunset Taverna for a seafood lunch with the prettiest view to fuel you for the walk back up the steps. (Just watch out for the donkeys on the way…)

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2. Beat the sunset crowds 

Everyone wants a piece of Oia, and it is quickly falling prey to its own popularity. The single path that leads up to the castle, and famed ‘sunset spot’, gets extremely crowded at dusk with hoards of tourists battling for a spot to watch the big, fiery ball descend into the ocean. Avoid the masses and watch the sunset in style at a rooftop restaurant. Skala has a direct view of the sunset from its rooftop terrace and the food is delicious and reasonably priced for Oia. 

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3. Sample Greek cuisine

I’m not ashamed to say I was most excited for the food when I visited Santorini. Greek food is delicious! Start the day with greek yoghurt and honey and grab a gyros stuffed with chicken and tzatziki for a filling afternoon snack. In the evening, begin with a greek salad and then opt for some fresh seafood pasta, washed down with a generous amount of Greek wine. Pair this with an Oia sunset and you’ve found paradise. If you’re still peckish after dinner, Milenio on the main street has a bakery underneath its restaurant which serves decadent slices of cake to take away. 

4. Shop for souvenirs and visit the art galleries 

Oia is the perfect place to pick up something pretty if you want to recreate the blue and white Santorini vibe back home. The main street is lined with shops selling decorative items, such as these lanterns, which would look gorgeous hanging in a garden. Remember to pick up a blue-eye trinket, to ward off the mati, or evil eye! These make great souvenirs, as does a box of Greek baklava for sweet-toothed family and friends. If you’re an art enthusiast, be sure to pop into the art galleries in Oia too, which are crammed full of pretty paintings of those blue domed roofs. 

5. Get THAT Instagram photo

Oia is paradise for the snap-happy; countless pretty doorways, bougainvillea trees and those ocean views. Find your favourite, most photogenic spot and snap an envy-inducing photo for the gram.

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The details

Get there

EasyJet do direct flights to Santorini (Thira) from London!

Stay

Golden East Hotel, Imerovigli – This gorgeous hotel is located near the pretty town of Imerovigli and conveniently located a 10 minute drive from Fira and 15 minute drive from Oia. Arrange car or quad bike hire with Nataly, who will be happy to help!

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Golden East Hotel

An alternative side to Paris; discovering bohemian Belleville 

We all have an image of Paris;  long, leafy boulevards lined with expensive stores and restaurants and haughty, impossibly chic women walking designer dogs while chain smoking thin cigarettes as the Eiffel tower twinkles in the distance. And that’s exactly what you see wandering down the Champs-Elysées or around picture-perfect neighbourhoods like Montmartre and Saint Germain des Pres.

But, as locals will tell you, this is not the real Paris. Many Parisians live outside of the centre, in the eastern suburbs. Belleville is an arty, multicultural neighbourhood in the 19th arrondissement, which sounds horribly far away but is actually only a 10 minute metro ride from the Arc de Triomphe. Few tourists wander out this way so there are limited hotel options, but as always, Air B&B is your friend. We found an entire apartment for around 120 euros a night, which was slightly on the pricey side but was perfectly located and absolutely gorgeous, with it’s airy, loft-like feel and cosy mezzanine bedroom. Mathieu’s place is in the heart of bustling Belleville, next to the Metro station and located conveniently next door to a shiny Sephora. (Au revoir hard-earned euros…)

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Mind your head on the ceiling upstairs! This quirky little loft was perfect for our stay.

Belleville is a hub of activity on Friday afternoon with the market in full swing and bars are already full of people fuelling themselves for the day with an espresso or two. There is a thriving Asian community here and we pause to grab a traditional Vietnamese sandwich, or banh mi; a baguette filled with pork, salad, coriander and fresh chilli. Delicious, filling and less than 3 euros!

Belleville is arguably most famous for being the birth place of Édith Piaf; the tragic, yet iconic ‘little sparrow.’ On the main street, at 72 Rue de Belleville, a simple gold plaque sits above a nondescript doorway which reads; ‘On the steps of this house in December 1915, was born into poverty Edith Piaf, whose voice would later move the world.’ Well, that’s my rough translation anyway! She was buried in Belleville in the famous Pere Lachaise cemetery along with many other iconic figures, including greats such as Jim Morrison and Oscar Wilde, whose grave is covered in lipstick kisses, not to mention French literary giants Moliere and Marcel Proust. You can take a guided tour of the cemetery, which is an interesting, if slightly morbid, way to spend an afternoon.

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‘La môme’

Homages to Piaf can be found dotted around the neighbourhood, a large, melancholy mural of her is painted on the wall of ‘Aux Folies’ where she used to sing in the 1920s, This infamous bar is always busy, crammed with coffee drinkers in the morning and, in the evening, the terrace is packed full of people chatting, smoking and enjoying a 4 euro beer or a couple of 6 euro cocktails. No outrageous Champs-Élysées prices here and the punters are mainly locals.

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‘I want to make people cry even when they don’t understand my words.’

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Immediately next to Aux Folies is Rue Denoyez, better known as Graffiti Alley, where the walls, street lamps, even the litter bins are entirely covered in bright street art. Tucked away down this colourful side street is Barbouquin, a little cafe filled with a jumble of books which you can leaf through as you while away an hour so with a coffee or a glass of wine.

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Le Barbouquin; cafe/bookshop/library/super chilled hangout spot

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We can’t leave Belleville without trying what is tipped as the trendiest new patisserie in Paris. Yann Couvreur is a celebrated pastry chef, and at his bright new bakery you can enjoy a 9 euro breakfast of coffee, fruit juice and something delicious like a Breton Kouign Amann or a Pistachio Chocolat Roule. This patisserie is famous for its classic ‘millefeuille’ which is whipped up fresh in front of you. Only 50 of these delicious French clsssics are made daily between 12 and 6, and its first come first served. At 10 euros its an expensive treat but one worth splashing out for, and this place gets top marks for decor and pretty packaging.

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Only a few thousand calories…tant pis!
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Get in quick if you want to get your hands on their signature millefeuille…
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A patisserie with attractive servers AND dangly foliage… win

So if you’ve already seen the picture-perfect side to Paris and are looking for a new neighbourhood to explore, follow in Piaf’s footsteps and head to Belleville to spend a day like a true Parisian.

One Day in Amsterdam

A mere 30 minute plane journey from London, the picturesque city of Amsterdam with its tall, narrow houses overlooking countless canals appears to be the perfect destination for a quick weekend break. Despite being just a hop across the water, somehow I had never visited this cultural capital. So I braved the groups of rowdy lads on stag dos and caught a flight from London Southend, to see if I could squeeze the best bits of the city into just one day.

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From the airport it’s only a 20 minute train ride to Amsterdam Centraal and from here the city hotspots are all within walking distance. Amsterdam is the perfect city to walk around and photograph; the higgledy-piggledy houses, the serene canals, the cosy waterfront shops and cafes. Just remember, cafes sell coffee and coffee shops sell weed. Confusing, I know. But you get used to it, like you get used to the faint but pervasive smell of marijuana that seems to cling to the air. And to your clothes.

It is perhaps due to the city’s tolerant attitude that the locals are so laid back and friendly.  (Although this view is possibly biased by the fact that I work in London where everyone is a miserable wanker.) Yet despite the uber trendy vibe of this capital and its hoards of tourists, everyone is just so bloody nice. People wander at a snail’s pace (literally the most irritating thing ever in London), yet here, no-one ever snaps. I didn’t hear a car horn or a bicycle bell once, a far cry from other European capitals where hardly a second goes by without a long, angry toot of a horn. Even when there are oblivious tourists wandering into the bike lanes and in front of trams. This is a relaxed, easy like Sunday morning kind of city and it’s an infectious attitude. This is reflected in the fashion here, which is casual and almost grungy, which works when you’re the right side of 25. Amsterdam is undeniably cool, an arty student city filled with young, unfairly attractive people.

While there is a huge selection of museums and galleries to choose from, with only a day to play with I had to be choosy. At the most popular spots, the Van Gogh Museum, Rijksmuseum and Heineken Experience, the queues can be enormous unless you’ve booked a ticket online, so instead I headed to The House of Bols, the oldest distillery in Amsterdam, if not the world. Bols was an early equivalent to gin and the base of many a cocktail back in the 1800s. The 16 euro entrance fee gains you access to the museum and a drink at the bar. We are handed a token and a small bottle of unidentified red liquid and told to drink it only when instructed to do so. Very Alice in Wonderland-esque. This time comes when we reach a dark room and a row of cubicles. Inside each one, a camera films you as you drink your alcoholic concoction while the cubicle vibrates and flashes. It’s a pretty odd experience to say the least.

The tour finishes at the bar, where your token can be exchanged for your desired tipple, various tasty Bols versions of classic cocktails. You can even try your hand at flair bartending in a secret booth. (Be aware though, that while you are flinging plastic bottles around and doing your best Tom Cruise impression, your efforts are being played on a screen outside for all the bar to see.)

From the House of Bols we amble around the town; visiting the floating flower market, to pick up some obligatory tulip bulbs, and the grounds of the famous Rijksmuseum where the i amserdam sign is mobbed by people clambering all over it. Our next stop is the Anne Frank Huis, (buy tickets in advance here to avoid the queues) perhaps the most famous of Amsterdam’s museums. An audio tour guides you around the cramped, dark rooms where the family hid in silence from the Nazis before they were discovered and led away to their deaths. It is an eerie tour, especially at dusk as the light is fading outside, throwing shadows into the corners of the tiny rooms. It’s a sobering visit, but an unmissable experience.

From here we stop at Cafe Schuim, an arty hipster hub in the heart of the city centre, for dinner and drinks. With the feel of an open-plan living room filled with a mish-mash of chairs, the impressively stocked bar dominates the left hand wall, while an enormous disco ball spins in the centre of the room. This is a great spot to sit and mingle with the locals and the food is delicious and reasonably priced.

Our next stop is a hidden gem, touted as the only speakeasy bar in Amsterdam. Door 74 is almost impossible to find, unless you know where to look. The unmarked entrance sits unassumingly between nondescript doorways, tucked down a causal side street. Inside, the friendly bartenders will whip you up any cocktail of your choosing with a healthy dose of flair and banter. The website marks the address as ‘On a need to know basis’ yet despite it’s secret location, this is a popular spot and you should book a seat ahead via their text message service. You’ll have to find a way to locate this place yourself! 😉

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We couldn’t spend a day in Amsterdam without visiting its most notorious area; De Wallen, better known as the Red Light District. Prostitution is legal in the Netherlands, yet it is still a strange experience to walk past half naked women beckoning from the windows. In order to understand more about the practice of prostitution here, reputedly the oldest profession in the world’, and to feel less like we have come simply to gawk at the women, we head inside Red Light Secrets, the Museum of Prostitution. This is a strange yet revealing experience, in places both funny and uncomfortable. An audio tour guides you around the rooms, which can be privately rented for around 150 euros per day, and lets you experience the view from the other side of the window. You can perch on a stool in a room bathed in red light, while passers by stare up at you from the street below. This experience sheds light on the reality of the prostitution business in Amsterdam which, although legal, is still a risky profession with tales of trafficking, exploitation and even murder.

There is a huge amount to see and do in this vibrant capital, there are enough museums and galleries to keep culture vultures entertained and for a laid-back weekend of ambling along the canals, people-watching and bar-hopping into the small hours there is no better place. It’s impossible to see everything in just one day, but with this intriguing city so close to home, I have a feeling I’ll be visiting again, and again to discover more of what Amsterdam has to offer.

 

 

How to do Rome in a day (on a budget!)

We all know Rome wasn’t built in a day. But believe it or not, it is possible to see the best that this incredibly beautiful city has to offer in the space of only 24 hours. All you need is a decent pair of shoes and a healthy dose of espresso to get you started. (Followed by cocktails. And then prosecco. And then more cocktails.  But we’ll get to that later.)

The key to seeing Rome’s best bits in such a short space of time is to keep moving, or more precisely, to avoid queues like the plague. No standing around in the heat, wedged between hot, disgruntled tourists in a queue that hasn’t moved an inch in the last 15 minutes. You may wonder what the point is in visiting Rome if you’re not going to see the interior of its most famous attractions: St Peter’s Basilica, the Sistine Chapel, the Colosseum. I hear you. I would have loved to have seen inside all of these places and if I were to come back with 2 weeks to spare and all my pre-booked, fast-track tickets ready I would absolutely visit all of them. But I had 24 hours, and tight purse strings, and I did not want to waste the entire day in a queue. Especially when the famous Italian organisational skills (ahem) are hard at work here. There are no signs at the Vatican to indicate which queue you should even be in as there are apparently different lines for people with tickets and those without. At the Colosseum noone seems to know which line they should be in or what they are doing or if they are actually in the queue for the Roman Forum next door, or if they’ll get all the way to the front of the queue only to be turned away for wearing Hawaiian-print shorts. The only people you can ask are the touts and hawkers who will invariably try to sell you overpriced ‘queue-jump’ tickets for various overpriced tours. It’s madness, and the tourists who have actually decided to brave the queues look stressed and miserable.

So, we skipped the queues and did Rome our way. Who needs to actually see inside the Colosseum when you can climb the stairs opposite and take pictures like these?

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Tick that one off the bucket list

When you only have one full day to see the city, the most important thing is to stay somewhere in a good location. We wanted to book a hostel that was both as central and as good value as possible and we found an absolute gem in B&B’s City House which seemed too good to be true. A stone’s throw from the Pantheon and less than a 10 minute walk from the Trevi fountain and Piazza Navona the entrance to this hostel sits unassumingly on the buzzing Via della Maddalena. B&B’s couldn’t be more central if it tried. The dorm rooms are reasonably priced, as are the doubles with shared bathroom. Forget standard hostel bathrooms with grey cubicles and strip lighting, this shared bathroom is as clean and homey as your own and the hostel feels more like a tucked-away boutique hotel, without the price tag.

As for seeing the sights, if you hit Rome’s cobbled streets early enough, you can cover the city completely on foot and avoid taking any public transport. (Always a plus in my opinion, public transport networks in major cities can be majorly confusing!) We are out of the hostel by 8am and in the ancient Pantheon by 8.05, gazing up at the impressive oculus in the domed ceiling. This early in the day there are no queues and we had this incredible place almost to ourselves. Rather than join a tour, we had previously downloaded a free podcast by Rick Steves onto our phones. This gave a bit of context to ‘all the old stuff’, and I’d definitely recommend this to anyone that wants to learn about the history of a place without paying a hefty fee for a guided tour!

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Rome’s oldest building, the Pantheon

Seeing as it’s still early in the day we decide to head over the bridge to Vatican City to see whether the queues are as bad as people say. They are. An enormous, chaotic snake of a queue has already formed at St Peter’s Square.  Rather than even attempt to find the end of it, we wander leisurely around the square, taking in the impressive view of the basilica while dodging large groups of Chinese tourists and disgruntled families who assume everyone is trying to jump the queue. Along the wide street that leads up to St Peter’s you can look inside several churches which are uncrowded and peaceful, such as the lovely Santa Maria in Traspontina, just a few metres from St Peters Square.  If, like me, you’re not at all religious you can still appreciate the incredible frescoes painted on the ceilings, not to mention it’s a welcome break from the tourists and the heat outside.

From Vatican City we walk back across the river in the rough direction of the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. (Don’t be deterred by what Google maps may tell you, it’s really not that far on foot!) As we wander down the shady streets we begin to hear the enticing sound of gushing water. A few twists and turns later we suddenly find ourselves at the famous Trevi Fountain, which seems to pop up out of nowhere in a small square filled with kissing couples and coin-tossing tourists.

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The famous Trevi Fountain, try to visit both during the day and after dark!

From here, it’s a short stroll to pretty Piazza Navona where you’ll find not one but three impressive fountains. This popular spot is the perfect place to take an espresso break or grab a slice of pizza and people watch. Or just take a seat and admire the impressively carved architecture… (ahem).

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He works out…
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Nailed it (sort of)

Over at the Colosseum, it’s another hectic swarm of confused queueing and jostling to get inside. We take the steps opposite, away from the heaving crowds and unhelpful hawkers down below, and find a quiet spot to take in the iconic view. The sprawling Roman forum is just next door and Palatine Hill can be seen behind in the distance. This is the ancient heart of the city and it’s an unmissable part of any trip to Rome. Even without visiting inside, it’s impossible not to feel in awe of this giant ancient wonder.

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Take the steps opposite the Colosseum for less crowded views

We continue up the steps opposite the Colosseum, ambling down cobbled streets that lead to small, fountain-filled piazzas, stopping for a cold drink or yet another cup of gelato. We peek inside the countless charming churches that seem to stand on every street, turn a corner to find ourselves in a courtyard filled with orange and lemon trees. This is the best way to see the city, just keep walking and take it all in. (Although Google maps does help if, like me, you have zero sense of direction and want to avoid getting completely lost or going round in circles!)

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A cute spot to grab a quick shot of espresso, down one of the countless cobbled streets
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Oranges & Lemons

Eventually we find ourselves at the very top of the gorgeous Spanish Steps, the traditional meeting place of artists, poets and bohemians. The steps spill out onto the busy Piazza di Spagna below, crowded with tourists, locals and covered in bright pink flowers. A super photogenic photo spot!

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Looking up to the top of the Spanish Steps, these gorgeous pink flowers are everywhere!
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1. Locate pretty flowers. 2.Perch awkwardly on ledge with very steep drop. 3. Take photo and try not to fall off

By this point it is late afternoon and, we have to admit, our feet are feeling pretty tired so we head back to the hostel for a power nap. (Yep, this one day itinerary even includes a nap!) But as soon as the sun starts to go down, it’s time to get up and get back out there because as every Italian knows, 6pm is aperitivo time. The best part of the day and an absolute must if you are visiting the city, aperitivo is the British equivalent of a long happy hour. But here in Rome, it is so much more than that. There is nothing quite like sipping cocktails as the sun goes down, at a busy street-side bar, listening to the buzz of excited, post-work chatter as everyone winds down after a long day in the city. Romans know their stuff when it comes to shaking a good cocktail, and in most bars your drink will be served with a light plate of something delicious to snack on while you sip.

Our evening unfolds slowly, hopping from bar to bar, starting at Gusto which is widely reputed to be the best aperitivo bar in the city due to its fantastic free buffet. The cocktails are delicious and you can take as many trips to the heavily laden buffet table as you like. If you’re on a tight budget but still want to dine in style, this is a great way to enjoy a light meal without forking out at a pricey restaurant.

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Gusto’s free buffet, order a drink, then grab a plate and fuel up!

After drinks at Gusto we head down Via del Pace, one of the small streets that lead off Piazza Navona, and apparently an aperitivo hotspot. The busy bars along this charming street are filled with locals and tourists alike. Make sure you do as the Romans do and order a classic Aperol Spritz, served with yet another plate of something delicious.

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No trip to Italy would be complete without an Aperol Spritz or 2! Or 3, or 4…

Although by this point we have eaten enough to feed a small army we can’t resist tucking into a pizza washed down with a bottle of prosecco at Pummerola, just opposite B&B’s City House back on Via della Maddalena. This place does the BEST pizza, the staff are friendly and it’s fantastic value for money despite it’s great location. (If you still have room after dinner, the gelateria next door serves 150 different flavours of gelato, at just 2.50 euros for two scoops! I can highly recommend the salted caramel and profiterole…)

No visit to Rome would feel complete without a trip across the river to the youthful, vibrant neighbourhood of Trastevere and the hip, late night hotspot that is Freni e Frizioni. This popular bar is always rammed, but you can take your drinks outside and join Rome’s cool kids on the steps that lead down to the river. Try the Green Day cocktail, a refreshing mix between a mojito and a slush puppy. Heaven.

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Thanks for the photo, Google. I’d had far too many cocktails by this point to be capable of working my camera…

At 2 am, after bar-hopping our way around the city and dragging our tired feet back across the bridge, we hear the familiar sound of running water and find ourselves back at the Trevi fountain. Lit up and illuminating the whole piazza, the fountain is almost deserted at this hour. Legend goes that anyone who throws a coin into the fountain will return to Rome some day so I rummage around my purse looking for a stray euro. But I  realise that I don’t need to throw in a coin to be sure of coming back.  I may have seen a lot in just one day, but I’m sure I’ve only scratched the surface of the sights and secrets this beautiful, ancient city has to offer.

Roma, mi manchi già!

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Ciao Roma, ci vediamo presto

On the ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ trail in Ubud with the elusive Ketut, the medicine man

I’d seen the movie, of course. Hasn’t everyone watched the ever-endearing  Julia Roberts amble across the globe on her soul seeking journey that all started in Bali with Ketut, the toothless medicine man who read her palm and set her future in motion? It’s a heartwarming tale, based on the author’s own life, worth a watch for the beautiful scenes of Ubud with it’s jungles and rice paddies alone. What I hadn’t realised was that Ketut’s character in the film is actually the same, real-life Ketut that the author had met and been so influenced by. And that he was still living right here, in Ubud.

When I spotted the sign pointing down a nondescript side road, I yanked my boyfriend so hard in excitement that our scooter nearly went careering off edge of the road and into the jungly undergrowth. The sign read simply, ‘Ketut Liyer’s House’ and we followed the road to a small, pretty guesthouse. Since the movie’s release, Ketut has become a local celebrity and his house a magnet for tourists who come to visit him and get their palms read by the cheerful medicine man. When we visited however it was late 2015 and Eat, Pray, Love had been released over 5 years ago. Remembering his crinkly face and toothless smile from the movie, I had to wonder how old Ketut could possibly be now…

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The spot where Ketut and Liz had their first meeting

The entrance to Ketut’s house and garden leads into a pretty courtyard, filled with flowers, caged birds and the heady smell of incense. The raised platform where Ketut does his readings is adorned with ornate images. I spot a faded photograph of a smiling Julia Roberts with Ketut and his family, but no sign of the man himself. The friendly man who welcomes us introduces himself as Ketut’s son and tells us that unfortunately his father is too tired to greet visitors today. ‘He is very old’, he laughs, ‘100 years old!’ Incredible. No wonder the guy wanted some peace and quiet. We wander around the guesthouse grounds which are serene and beautiful. It’s not hard to see why Elizabeth Gilbert was so enchanted by this place.

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Spot Julia
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Ketut’s son, who will take over his father’s role of medicine man

Sadly, I recently saw in an article that Ketut passed away in the summer of 2016, at the age of 100, only a few months after we visited. I’m sure though that his memory will live on. In those who will watch the film and be seduced by the mysticism and serenity of Ubud and will flock to visit his guesthouse to sit cross-legged on that well-worn platform in the hope of catching some words of wisdom from a wise, old medicine man.

Rest in peace Ketut, or as you would say, ‘See you later, alligator.’

5

Angkor Wat, Bayon and Ta Prohm: Exploring the incredible ancient temples of Angkor

Before I visited Cambodia, I didn’t know a single thing about the country except that it was pretty close to Thailand and had a famous temple with a funny name. Ashamed as I am to admit it, that was the extent of my knowledge of the country that would soon become my favourite in South East Asia. Cambodia really does have it all. It is a country with a fascinating yet tragic history, beaches to rival those of neighbouring Vietnam and Thailand and the hotspot cities of Siem Reap and Pnohm Penh are a must for culture junkies who aren’t afraid of a wild party or two. Not to mention Cambodia has one of the largest temple complexes in the world, the 400km expanse of Angkor, an ancient Khmer city filled to the brim with crumbling, Tombraider-esque temples slowly being taken over by the jungle. (Read on to the end for some top tips before you visit!)

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Another day, another temple
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The 54 ‘devas’ guarding the southern entrance to Angkor
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The opposing figures at the South Gate depict the battle between the ‘devas’ (gods) and the ‘asuras’ (demons)

Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat is the superstar here, claiming the number one spot in Lonely Planet’s Ultimate travel List. (Grab a copy for your coffee table here.)  The best time to visit the iconic temple is sunrise, so take it easy on the beer pong the night before, especially if you’re staying at the Downtown Hostel in Siem Reap which is notorious for it’s Pub Street bar crawls. Your hostel can arrange for a local guide to pick you up on a tuk-tuk in the dark at around 4.00am to arrive at Angkor Wat in time for sunrise. Despite the early hoards of selfie-stick wielding tourists, there is an undeniably mystical, serene atmosphere here. The morning mist hangs heavy in the humid air and countless dragonflies dance around the crumbling stones. Try and wrestle your way to a spot right in front of the water so you can watch the sun slowly appear behind the magnificent temple and see its shimmering reflection. Or just do what this lady did and ignore the temple right in front of you to snap a picture of a postcard…strange.

 

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The real thing is directly opposite you love…
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5am faces…
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The sun rising slowly behind Angkor Wat

 

There is far, far more to the temples of Angkor than Angkor Wat alone. There is a vast array of temples dotted around the ancient complex. You won’t be able to see everything in a day, your best bet is to buy a 3 day ticket and let your guide ferry you around the temples on a tuk-tuk. Just remember to tip your driver after the 3 days! Your other options include cycling, but the midday heat is seriously sweltering and the temples are spread widely apart. You could take an elephant too, but it’d take you a hell of a long time to see everything and, with all tourist attractions such as this, the welfare of the elephants is always questionable.

 

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Taking a break from the heat
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Monkeys often bring traffic to a halt as they amble across the road

 

Bayon

Bayon is a mind-boggling temple where 216 serene stone faces smile down at you from every angle. The entire temple is covered in bas-reliefs, figures etched into the stone, depicting mythological scenes and everyday life in 12th century Cambodia. Inside feels like a giant hall of mirrors with its endless, long hallways of crumbling stone and small shrines sit in silent corners adorned with flowers and incense.

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The huge, smiling faces of Bayon

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For a small fee you can have your photo taken with locals in traditional dress at Bayon
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Just one of thousands of bas-reliefs carved into the temple walls

Ta Prohm

Nowhere is the power of nature more apparent than at Ta Prohm temple, or ‘The Tombraider Temple’, where the jungle has literally taken over. Long tree roots have entwined themselves around the stones and grown around doorways, enveloping the temple which buckles under the force of nature. You can’t help but unleash your inner Lara Croft here, or picture yourself in an Indiana Jones movie. The temple itself is a maze of narrow hallways and you’ll find yourself at a twisting series of dead ends, the passage blocked by fallen stone blocks. The light filtering down through the trees and the sounds of the surrounding jungle add to the mysticism and other-worldliness of this place.

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Teeny doorways

Angkor Wat, Bayon and Ta Prohm are only the tip of the iceberg of temples to explore. Take your time and prepare to be enchanted by this truly incredible part of this beautiful country.

Things to be aware of before you visit:

Dress code: Although a tourist attraction, Angkor is still a religious site and therefore you should dress appropriately. This can be a struggle in the midday heat, as you can see from my photos I didn’t always follow my own advice. Your best bet is to keep your shoulders covered with a loose shirt or kimono to stay cool while dressing respectfully.

Child hawkers: You will be followed constantly by cute kids selling postcards and trinkets. Remember that the Angkor complex is enormous and there are populated villages scattered around so these children’s families live nearby. Although the constant hassling can be tedious, remember that these families often have no other option than to send their children out to make a living.

The heat: Oh god the heat. The temple complex is huge and you will spend full days walking around endless temples in the midday sun. Bring lots of water and suncream and try to stay in the shade as much as possible. Some temples have hundreds of steps, so take it easy!

Tourists: Try to visit the most popular temples mentioned above as early or late in the day as possible, to avoid the crowds. There are so many other temples to explore during the day that you’ll often find yourself the only person there!

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